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             Montana Log and Timber Products

                                the lodge pole forest where we work 

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Montana logging

 Montana log and timber

Whitefish operations

 highway 93 North

1-406-235-0659                              

 

 

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This is what we want our forests to be. The sounds, smell, wildlife, brisk mountain air with scent of wetlands, pine or spruce.  Ad the rain smell or silence of winters first snow...that's what we like.  Then there's the sounds of the kids ...breaking all that tranquilly of a mountain experience. But they will always have that  special memory...so I guess its worth it.

Forests fire, it will happen, we can slow it down, contain some of it, but its natural and needed in the cycle of forest life. We may not like it but the Wilderness is what it is because of it.  If you don't remove the dead, dying  or sick timber by  thinning  and pruning ,  its easily catches and burns extremely hotter taking out the younger and healthier forests….Remember Yellowstone

After fire the lodgepole pine is the first tree to grow. It thrives on the fire,  I think it would go extinct with out fire, the acid in the ash is fertilizer for the seeds that only pop out of the cone with extreme heat. 

  Lodgepole or jack pine is a sun tolerant tree. It does well in the sun where most all other evergreens cant survive without shade or canopy to  establish a hold on life .

The pine cones hold the seeds for many years waiting for a 200 to 400 degree heat. Then they release there seeds into the ash. See them here several years after a fire. Now some spruce, larch, firs, alpines can take root  protected from the sun, and  find damp soil.  I call it a miracle  tree because of its qualities. When  I was young we just dozed it into piles and burnt them to clear our lands.

Left is 1975 this is me in re growth from “The Great Fire of 1910”  it killed near 100 people in two days burnt  4 Yellowstone's in size.  See how thick it grew back in 50 years.

   Right is same see how thick it grows in the back ground? Its so thick no sun light get to the ground

 Right see how thick  it grows after a fire? You can hardly walk thru it. Left is forest where the beetles are killing the lodgepole and it falls creating forest fuels now days called Biomass

Lodgepole

Forests  

we lease,

harvesting

the dead

poles

Cleaning

Out the

Dead

          use the wood  ! 

  Its all wasting away and regulations wont allow you to hardly get into the woods to salvage it.  So it catches fire, breeds more bugs.  While we import fossil fuels and burn coal to heat and power our homes… your welcome to it just don't step on the grass.

Beatles and

the dying

Forests

John Deere

Forest friendly

Equipment

Slash piles are targeted to find a useable  energy  source.  We been trying to work with USDA with some practical & feasible Ideas how to do that but politics and Government Bureaucracy have to run there coarse. City folk in Washington, with a college degree, and an agenda, sitting behind a desk, are at a loss.... ITS WOOD ... BURN IT.

  Wood  burnt has a zero carbon footprint.

All natural forests sooner or later burn, but thinning some as it dies then putting it to good use creates jobs, builds things, heats homes, saves forests, and wildlife and there habitat. 

Pine Beetle and Larva girdling the outer new ring growth that caries the sap the lodgepole  pine thrives on. Most trees uses the center or hart that flows the sap, sugar, pitch that allows the tree to grow. So the lodgepole pines easily die by fire and bugs. But they served their purpose... Sun tolerant they are they created a canopy to shade the other species of timber that now take over.

Montana Log and Timber co                                                            

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Salish Mountains Wildlife Corridor

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Lodge pole forest & logging